Folsom woman tracks lost suitcase’s whirlwind journey while she’s left on vacation without it

Terri Stackhouse isn’t a big world traveler, but there are places she’s always wanted to see.”I’ve always dreamed of going to Ireland,” Stackhouse said.Then an opportunity of sorts knocked on her door.In 2020, she was laid off from her job of 40 years, but she did not let that get her down. Instead, she followed through on an idea.”I decided to take the severance and take the trip I always wanted to take,” Stackhouse said. With newfound time and resources on her hands, Stackhouse started planning what she calls “a dream trip” for her family. She spent a whole year researching – looking for places to go and things to do. She worked hours each day, accounting for every detail. She made sure certain hotels and attractions were wheelchair-accessible, as she is disabled. Stackhouse purchased travel insurance and booked tickets on British Airways, the airline — her research informed her — would be the easiest to navigate in her wheelchair.”I checked off all the boxes,” she said. “It was just supposed to be the perfect trip.” She even outfitted her entire family’s luggage with SmartTags – small digital tracking devices that allowed her to see where their bags were at all times. Shortly after arriving on European soil, however, there was a wee bit of a snag.”We arrived in Dublin, but our luggage didn’t,” Stackhouse said. No luggage for her, or the other family members in her group. Not to worry, Stackhouse thought. Ever the planner, she had packed two days’ worth of medicine and clothing in her carry-on bag. British Airways assured her it wouldn’t take more than a few days for their bags to be delivered to them. However, luggage delivery day came and went without her suitcase being delivered. The airline only delivered her family members’ luggage. So she tracked it with that SmartTag.” It made the trek over to Dublin — then it said it went to Dubai — then it went back to Heathrow, and then it went back to Dubai, and Heathrow,” Stackhouse explained. “At one point since I’ve been home, it’s gone to New Delhi!”With her suitcase on a whirlwind journey of its own, Stackhouse is left feeling frustrated to have spent her three weeks abroad without it.”I think my luggage has had a better trip than me,” she said. The technology kept her so close, while she was so far away from her bag.”I was able to check it on my phone and see where it was the whole time,” Stackhouse said . “It just wasn’t getting to me.” Now back home, more than a month later, Stackhouse is still waiting to be reunited with her bag. She’s made numerous phone calls, she has sent emails, and she has filed everything she can on the airline’s website, she said – trying to get it back.”I see where it is. It’s there,” she said, pointing to a map on her phone. “It’s not in the ether.” British Airways told KCRA 3 that Stackhouse’s final bag was sent by FedEx on Monday, and expects to get it to her soon. “We’ve been doing everything we can to reunite our customers with their luggage as soon as possible. We apologize for the delay and inconvenience caused,” the airlines said in a statement. KCRA 3 asked British Airways about the average wait time for travelers and why Stackhouse’s bag did all that traveling without her, but have not yet heard back regarding those questions.

Terri Stackhouse isn’t a big world traveler, but there are places she’s always wanted to see.

“I’ve always dreamed of going to Ireland,” Stackhouse said.

Then an opportunity of sorts knocked on her door.

In 2020, she was laid off from her job of 40 years, but she didn’t let that get her down. Instead, she followed through on an idea.

“I decided to take the severance and take the trip I always wanted to take,” Stackhouse said.

With newfound time and resources on her hands, Stackhouse started planning what she calls “a dream trip” for her family.

She spent a whole year researching – looking for places to go and things to do. She worked hours each day, accounting for every detail.

She made sure certain hotels and attractions were wheelchair-accessible, as she is disabled.

Stackhouse purchased travel insurance and booked tickets on British Airways, the airline — her research informed her — would be the easiest to navigate in her wheelchair.

“I checked off all the boxes,” she said. “It was just supposed to be the perfect trip.”

She even outfitted her entire family’s luggage with SmartTags – small digital tracking devices that allowed her to see where their bags were at all times.

Shortly after arriving on European soil, however, there was a wee bit of a snag.

“We arrived in Dublin, but our luggage didn’t,” Stackhouse said.

No luggage for her, or the other family members in her group.

Not to worry, Stackhouse thought. Ever the planner, she had packed two days’ worth of medicine and clothing in her carry-on bag.

British Airways assured her that it wouldn’t take more than a few days for their bags to be delivered to them.

However, luggage delivery day came and went without her suitcase being delivered. The airline only delivered her family members’ luggage.

So she tracked it with that SmartTag.

“It made the trek over to Dublin — then it said it went to Dubai — then it went back to Heathrow, and then it went back to Dubai, and Heathrow,” Stackhouse explained. “At one point since I’ve been home, it’s gone to New Delhi!”

With her suitcase on a whirlwind journey of her own, Stackhouse is left feeling frustrated to have spent her three weeks abroad without it.

“I think my luggage has had a better trip than me,” she said.

The technology kept her so close, while she was so far away from her bag.

“I was able to check it on my phone and see where it was the whole time,” Stackhouse said. “It just wasn’t getting to me.”

Now back home, more than a month later, Stackhouse is still waiting to be reunited with her bag. She’s made numerous phone calls, she’s sent emails, and she’s filed everything she can on the airline’s website, she said – trying to get it back.

“I see where it is. It’s there,” she said, pointing to a map on her phone. “It’s not in the ether.”

British Airways told KCRA 3 that Stackhouse’s final bag was sent by FedEx on Monday, and expects to get it to her soon.

“We’ve been doing everything we can to reunite our customers with their luggage as soon as possible. We apologize for the delay and inconvenience caused,” the airlines said in a statement.

KCRA 3 asked British Airways about the average wait time for travelers and why Stackhouse’s bag did all that traveling without her, but have not yet heard back regarding those questions.

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