What Kinds of “Made from Real …!” Credit Card Products Will We See Next?

Eye of the Flyer, a division of Chatterbox Entertainment, Inc. has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Eye of the Flyer and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyzes & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Delta Air Lines and American Express recently ended a promotion giving new applicants the opportunity to get a new Delta SkyMiles® Reserve American Express card made from a real, retired Boeing 747 aircraft. (Existing cardholders also could order the 747 metal cards – but that inventory apparently ran out rather quickly.)

Honestly, I love this kind of creative approach when it comes to products and marketing. I ordered my Delta 747 Reserve card hours after they became available. The card’s concept is pretty cool. As an aviation enthusiast, it’s fun thinking something in my wallet has a small piece of an actual 747 in it.

That got me wondering: what kind of travel-oriented credit cards we’ll see in the future that might be constructed from other themed, real-world materials?

The key, of course, is for the cards to feature something appealing to everyone – new and existing cardholders. I presume they want people to show off their cards to others (“Hey, look at my brand new credit card made from real …”) and sort of act as de facto salespeople.

So, with that in mind, here are a few ideas:

(© iStock.com / Michael Burrell)

Casino Chips, Cards, and Dice

What about using old casino chips, playing cards, and dice as part of a new credit card? Security company SEM Custom Solutions is apparently entrusted to help destroy old gaming ware. I bet some of the particles made up of shredded cards, chips, and dice could help comprise a credit card gaming enthusiasts would enjoy.

I think this could really be a good idea if the chips, cards, and dice are taken from defunct casinos. MGM Resorts and Mirage have a prime opportunity for this when Mirage becomes a Hard Rock Hotel.

An amusement park roller coaster
(© iStock.com / xavdlp)

Amusement Park Rides (Hello, Disney!)

I admittedly don’t know a lot about how amusement parks operate. But I imagine some ride parts get replaced on a somewhat regular basis. So, I wonder if something like metal from tracks or rollercoaster wheels could be recycled and used for credit cards.

The exceptionally devoted Disney fans would probably love something like this. (“This credit card is made from a metal restraint bar in the Haunted Mansion!”)

Cruise Ships

Can you imagine how delighted frequent floaters (such as René and Lisa) would be to hold a credit card made from a real cruise liner that sailed the world? (Although, maybe they’d abstain if the card were made from a Carnival ship.) It would be fun to learn about the ship: where it sailed, how many miles it traveled, etc.

Amtrak Coast Starlight train (Los Angeles - Seattle) powered by P42DC locomotives at Moorpark, California.
(© iStock.com / Laser1987)

Trains

What do you think about a credit card partially made from the skin of a retired train car? I’m thinking something along the lines of an Amtrak or similar passenger train – a car that traveled cross-country. (I don’t know that a subway car would be the most romantic credit card.)

What Ideas Do You Have?

Do you like any of the ideas above? What real-world items do you think would make a good travel credit card? Please tell us in the below Comments section!

Eye of the Flyer, a division of Chatterbox Entertainment, Inc. has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Eye of the Flyer and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyzes & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Responses are not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser’s responsibility to ensure all posts and / or questions are answered.


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