Florida engineer working towards zero-carbon emission flights

Hydrogen may hold the key to greener aviation through zero-carbon emission flights. The University of Central Florida’s Dr. Jay Kapat is trying to develop a sustainable fueling system for airplanes. He explains how it would work. “On board the airplane, the ammonia would be broken up into hydrogen and oxygen. There is zero carbon anywhere,” Kapat said. Kapat’s team is working under a $10 million grant from NASA. Right now, global carbon emissions for aviation are up to 8% of the whole. This isn’t the first time hydrogen has been experimented with. During the Cold War, the government set up a town as a front for testing liquid hydrogen. Apix housed a fertilizer plant that held a secret.”So they were trying to develop liquid hydrogen and they needed to do it in a place where they weren’t near a big city in case something went horribly wrong, as they say,” Kapat said. It was called Project Suntan. The goal was to develop a U-2 space plane to spy on the Soviets. “Naturally, because of the Cold War, there’s no way the US government wanted the Ruskies to know,” Kapat said. That project shut down after about a year. But, years later, similar work with hydrogen continues. This time, though, the battle is against climate change.

Hydrogen may hold the key to greener aviation through zero-carbon emission flights.

The University of Central Florida’s Dr. Jay Kapat is trying to develop a sustainable fueling system for airplanes. He explains how it would work.

“On board the airplane, the ammonia would be broken up into hydrogen and oxygen. There is zero carbon anywhere,” Kapat said.

Kapat’s team is working under a $10 million grant from NASA. Right now, global carbon emissions for aviation are up to 8% of the whole.

This isn’t the first time hydrogen has been experimented with. During the Cold War, the government set up a town as a front for testing liquid hydrogen. Apix housed a fertilizer plant that kept a secret.

“So they were trying to develop liquid hydrogen and they needed to do it in a place where they weren’t near a big city in case something went horribly wrong, as they say,” Kapat said.

It was called Project Suntan. The goal was to develop a U-2 space plane to spy on the Soviets.

“Naturally, because of the Cold War, there’s no way the US government wanted the Ruskies to know,” Kapat said.

That project shut down after about a year. But, years later, similar work with hydrogen continues. This time, though, the battle is against climate change.

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