Gov. Kevin Stitt, Oklahoma tribes clash again over traffic laws

The latest clash between Gov. Kevin Stitt and Oklahoma tribes is over traffic laws. On Tuesday, KOCO 5 asked lawmakers if they are planning to override the governor’s latest veto. Supporters said the bill would ensure the state can keep track of traffic offenses, including DUIs, even if the conviction comes from tribal court.However, the governor called the bill a wolf in sheep’s clothing.Stitt vetoed House Bill 3501 on Monday, despite a 69-3 vote in the House and a 44-1 vote in the Senate. The bill would require the state’s Department of Public Safety to view a traffic offense the same, whether the conviction happened in a state court or a tribal court.”We need government, state and tribal to come together and work together for the people for all of the people,” said state Rep. Justin Humphrey, (R) Lane.Humphrey was one of the authors of the bill, which had support from lawmakers across the aisle and the Choctaw Nation.”If your son or daughter is run over by somebody who is DUI, or something like that , then you don’t really care whether they’re tribal or non-tribal,” Humphrey said.The governor said the bill fails to require transparency, accountability and reciprocity, something he should be expected of all “legitimate governments.”Humphrey told KOCO 5 he would consider voting to override the veto.”I think I’ll come down on overriding the veto because I believe we need it, but do I understand what he’s saying, that there’s a lot bigger picture here, I do understand what the governor is saying,” Humphrey said.To override the veto, two-thirds of representatives would have to agree and it would have to happen by the end of the session less than three weeks from now.

The latest clash between Gov. Kevin Stitt and Oklahoma tribes is over traffic laws.

On Tuesday, KOCO 5 asked lawmakers if they are planning to override the governor’s latest veto. Supporters said the bill would ensure the state can keep track of traffic offenses, including DUIs, even if the conviction comes from tribal court.

However, the governor called the bill a wolf in sheep’s clothing.

Stitt vetoed House Bill 3501 on Monday, despite a 69-3 vote in the House and a 44-1 vote in the Senate. The bill would require the state’s Department of Public Safety to view a traffic offense the same, whether the conviction happened in a state court or a tribal court.

“We need government, state and tribal to come together and work together for the people for all of the people,” said state Rep. Justin Humphrey, (R) Lane.

Humphrey was one of the authors of the bill, which had support from lawmakers across the aisle and the Choctaw Nation.

“If your son or daughter is run over by somebody who is DUI, or something like that, then you don’t really care whether they’re tribal or non-tribal,” Humphrey said.

The governor said the bill fails to require transparency, accountability and reciprocity, something he should be expected of all “legitimate governments.”

Humphrey told KOCO 5 he would consider voting to override the veto.

“I think I’ll come down on overriding the veto because I believe we need it, but do I understand what he’s saying, that there’s a lot bigger picture here, I do understand what the governor is saying,” Humphrey said.

To override the veto, two-thirds of representatives would have to agree and it would have to happen by the end of the session less than three weeks from now.

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